Wednesday, April 23, 2008

USGS Bakken Study Slides

I don't know how long the slides have been available, but it sheds a little light into the methodology they used.

USGS Slides

Also, there is a very detailed examination of the Bakken play at the
The Oil Drum, which I confess I only have time to skim through right now.

7 comments:

david said...

To me, a lot of this discussion hinges on whether fields such as Parshall/Sanish/Austin represent uniquely productive Bakken features that are seldom found elsewhere in the Bakken, or whether these fields are more or less "typical" of what can happen practically anywhere in the Bakken simply by applying current lateral drilling technology.

There was no shortage of holes drilled in what is now the Parshall field in the 70s and 80s and all were declared dry and plugged. There were similar dry vertical holes drilled in many areas of the Bakken back then that came up dry and in areas where no activity is now taking place and producing wells are not currently found.

However, EOG candidly admits that there was something in the geology of one of these old Parshall field dry holes (I think it was 8071 located a mile from Bartelson well on section 7 152-90) that caught their attention despite the fact that the hole had been drilled (by Lear Petroleum and declared dry way back in 1981). Had the data from this dry well not caught the eyes of the geologists at EOG the Parshall field may never had been developed!

So, where you come out on the long-term productivity of the Bakken in large measure depends on whether you belive that the current developing fields represent more or less unique sites within the area for lateral drilling, or whether it is simply a matter of applying lateral drilling technology to get productive wells on practically any section you drill anywhere in the Bakken. No one knows the answer to this important, not me, not the USGS and certainly not the drilling companies--yet.

My personal belief is that what they found in these currently active fields represents a "somewhat unique" situation and that we will likely never see drillers tacking all of the Bakken area with the same intensity now happining in the current fields. But that still could mean that there are many other fields within the Bakken where if the right technology is applied some very productive wells can be drilled. Right now, the success of the companies in the Parshall/Austin and Sanish field is attracting other players to the area like flies to honey, and it should not be long until we have a much clearer picture of what really lies within the Bakken. And, of course, my beliefs could be wrong--in either direction!

Stay tuned!
This is all going to get more and more interesting, especially if oil prices keep rising.

Steve said...

Has anyone heard how the microfracturing study is going in Williams County. I recall that this study is being jointly funded by the State of ND, Headington and, I think, Continental? I'm not sure, if they have started this, will be doing this in the future...

dpaulson said...

I see that St.Mary has now obtained 22 permits since 3/24 in T158 & T159 R91 & 92. Fidelity has 5 and has rigs on T159 R92 Sec.9 and T157 R92 Sec. 11 With permits for T158 R92 Sec.11&21 and T159 R92 Sec.20. Brigham has a rig on T158 R91 Sec,33.

My question is with Fidelity, Brigham and Hess drilling, and EOG going to spud a wild cat in May just NE in T159 R91 (all on the perimeter of St.Mary"s permits) Why is St. Mary obtaining so many permits with so few rigs and not drilling yet?

Anonymous said...

I see that St.Mary has now obtained 22 permits since 3/24 in T158 & T159 R91 & 92. Fidelity has 5 and has rigs on T159 R92 Sec.9 and T157 R92 Sec. 11 With permits for T158 R92 Sec.11&21 and T159 R92 Sec.20. Brigham has a rig on T158 R91 Sec,33.

My question is with Fidelity, Brigham and Hess drilling, and EOG going to spud a wild cat in May just NE in T159 R91 (all on the perimeter of St.Mary"s permits) Why is St. Mary obtaining so many permits with so few rigs and not drilling yet?

ddpaulson

jrmellem said...

who knows?
who knows?

Anonymous said...

http://www.ndoilgas.govoffice.com/

Anonymous said...

Note, from the slides:

The USGS study methodology is based on "historical exploration and production analyses", and concerns only undiscovered resources.

Elm Coulee (responsible for 65MMBO, or more than 60% of total Bakken production to date) is on the "edge" of the Bakken, in the middle sandstone member.