Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Larry's Water Chart For Mountrail Co.

Larry provided this awhile ago, but I've been derelict in posting it. It had more info but I had to delete some to make it fit width-wise. He added:

This is a spreadsheet for April 2008 showing the oil and water production for the Bakken wells in Mountrail County. It is sorted by the top water producer as a percent of oil production. I am not sure any firm conclusions can be drawn from this data other than Hess’s name appears a lot as does Brigham’s name. The frequency by which their wells encounter water could be more a function of where they are drilling than their drilling and completing skills.









Well bbls bbls h2O %
operator well name No.
oil water of oil
Hess BARSTAD 15889 379 3076 812%
Marathon NELSON 14-33H 16552 366 1163 318%
Hess LALIM D. #34-11H 16292 1126 2216 197%
Brigham BERGSTROM
16840 1755 3125 178%
Hess EN-HEGLAND-
16674 732 1102 151%
Brigham HALLINGSTAD
16978 5201 6510 125%
Hess Enget 4-11H 16168 398 447 112%
Hess J. HORST 1-11H 15986 382 394 103%
PetroHunt TORGERSON
16663 766 714 93%
Hunt PATTEN 1-27H 16799 5391 4518 84%
Fidelity DEADWOOD
16876 3061 2463 80%
Brigham HYNEK 2 1H 16898 2195 1687 77%
Hess RS-STATE-
16800 3591 2152 60%
Hess H. Juma 1-9H 16011 395 219 55%
PetroHunt RICE 10B-2-1H 16348 1524 819 54%
Hess RS-NELSON
16824 4712 2064 44%
MRR corp MANITOU 4-1H 15916 388 160 41%
Brigham BAKKE 23 1-H 16893 3625 1440 40%


16092 384 149 39%


15845 893 331 37%


16880 5565 1917 34%


16670 2207 683 31%


16833 11611 3253 28%


16822 8703 2334 27%


16394 2386 614 26%


16068 2335 527 23%


16550 10395 2151 21%


16577 12926 2085 16%


16461 7383 1185 16%


16467 7360 1044 14%


16346 10073 1338 13%


16635 7185 893 12%


16543 11244 1299 12%


16637 12410 1170 09%


16497 11304 1053 09%


16457 11647 1049 09%


16324 5474 324 06%


16532 11489 667 06%


16463 9061 483 05%


16469 14266 760 05%


16671 12471 652 05%


16578 12002 623 05%


16731 11366 578 05%


16750 5610 276 05%


16484 12607 619 05%


16713 28263 1353 05%


16371 11453 521 05%


16768 16331 714 04%


16795 20416 834 04%


16483 12229 474 04%


16776 9673 300 03%


16370 9343 98 01%


16164 2058 7 00%


16839 16108 0 0%


16881 9830 0 0%


16930 14557 0 0%


15925 0 0


16160 0 0


16233 0 0

8 comments:

david said...

The part I haven't figured out is that frequently you see initial production figures in which bopd and bwpd are listed, and the water number frequently is as large or larger than the oil number.But once a well goes into production,if your data are correct, the amount of water apparently drops drastically, to just a small percentage of the oil produced. (In the case of Geving 09, iirc, the initial production was 895 bopd and about 1600 bwpd) I never did quite figure out how the operators were disposing of all the water if they were dealing with as much or more water than oil coming from a well. But this all seems a lot simpler if the amount of water is just a small percentage of the oil for a typical well in production.

Anonymous said...

Do the water numbers include only formation water, or do they include load water as well? Or is there any way to know?

Anonymous said...

Where did Larry get that data. I am looking for data on well 16664

Larry said...

This data comes from the NDIC Subscription website.

Well 16664 produced 5421 barrels of oil and 15 barrels of water in May.

Anonymous said...

Is the water part of the millions of gallons
they use to fracture??

Anonymous said...

Quite often the initial production test is done with a fully opened valve on the wellhead.

This helps define the widely touted initial BOEPD rates you see.

However, once the cooler heads start to prevail and a little better understanding of the pressure losses associated with an unregulated flow the valve will be closed or "choked". Often this is measured as a fraction in XX/64.

Very often you can reduce the amount of produced water by choking the well back. Oil being lighter than water does matter. And so does the cost of disposal of the salt water produced.

Allen S.

Anonymous said...

Quite often the initial production test is done with a fully opened valve on the wellhead.

This helps define the widely touted initial BOEPD rates you see.

However, once the cooler heads start to prevail and a little better understanding of the pressure losses associated with an unregulated flow the valve will be closed or "choked". Often this is measured as a fraction in XX/64.

Very often you can reduce the amount of produced water by choking the well back. Oil being lighter than water does matter. And so does the cost of disposal of the salt water produced.

Allen S.

Anonymous said...

what are the production numbers for wells 17145, 17075, and 17154?